NIKKI SIXX Calls On Lawmakers To Take Action On U.S. Gun Laws: 'We Need To Have Better Laws In Place'

Nikki Sixx has once again called on lawmakers to enact tougher guns laws following mass shootings across the United States that killed at least 35 in August. Speaking to Billboard magazine, the MÖTLEY CRÜE bassist said: "People are, like, 'You're not going to take my guns away.' We're not saying that. We're saying with all these shootings, with all this access to military weaponry, we need to have better laws in place. It's so polarizing. You have to sit in that uncomfortable position, whether it's in social media or in a meeting, and just understand that there are two sides to the coin. We're trying to find the best solution." Right after the recent El Paso shooting, Sixx accused President Donald Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell via Twitter of "enabling these violent acts by obstructing common-sense legislation that would make it more difficult for would-be mass shooters to obtain weapons designed to mass kill human beings." He later added: "I don't know about you, but I'm fucking sick of hearing about innocent people being slaughtered city after city because the politicians chose money over passing stricter gun control laws." After one of Sixx's Twitter followers pointed out that "Australia's last mass shooting was in 1996 and nothing since due to harsh gun reforms..America's 'gun toting' attitude needs to change...", Sixx responded: "We refer to this often when talking about change and saving people lives.Imagine how many thousands of lives would have been saved if the politicians ( aka NRA puppets) would of followed suit." Several other high-profile musicians have called on lawmakers to take action when it comes to gun laws in the United States, including Corey Taylor (SLIPKNOT), Paul Stanley (KISS), Sebastian Bach (SKID ROW), Dee Snider (TWISTED SISTER) and Alex Skolnick (TESTAMENT). According to ABC News, 58 percent of Americans express confidence that stricter gun laws would reduce mass shootings; 41 percent are skeptical.